Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 2: Pass It On

Colin tells his guests why Jamie's Food Revolution is important to him

When Colin originally decided to have a Food Revolution theme to his birthday party, the plan was little more than to serve all healthy, made from scratch foods.  Soon after, the Flash Mob idea started to take shape.  Then I got Jamie’s Food Revolution cookbook.  It’s more than just a collection of recipes.  Jamie gives his readers a challenge.  Here’s an excerpt from the book:

This pass it on movement is essentially a modern-day version of the way people used to pass recipes down through generations when they weren’t all at work. That dynamic is the best learning ground ever.  As simple as it seems, pass it on could well be the most radical food movement in recent years, and you could be part of it.  I wouldn’t be asking for your help unless I thought it was absolutely necessary.

In his book Jamie asks the reader to do two things: (1) learn a recipe from each chapter, and (2) personally teach these recipes to others.

So I asked Colin if he was up to learning at least one recipe to teach everyone at his party. He took Jamie’s book to bed with him for his nightly reading.  He was more than up to it.

He chose a recipe: Jamie’s sizzling beef with scallions and black bean sauce. I bought the ingredients and we did a trial run.

Colin does a trial run of preparing Jamie's Sizzling Beef with Scallions and Black Bean Sauce recipe

Delicious!

So the menu for Colin’s party was planned: sizzling beef stir fry, a huge salad bar, and for dessert, fresh fruit.

After suprising and entertaining Colin’s guests with a rendition of Jamie’s Flash Mob, Colin invited them into the kitchen to watch him prepare the stir fry.

He passed it on.

He showed them step by step what to do and shared copies of the recipe with everyone.

Dinner was a wonderful success.  In addition to the two servings that Colin made in front of his guests, we had two trays of sizzling beef and a glorious, colorful salad bar (pictures below).

It was Colin’s tenth birthday, so although flanked by lots of fresh fruit, we did include a cake in the celebration.

Colin's Food Revolution birthday cake made by Mom

We’re committed to keeping the pledge.  Lila helped me make Jamie’s meatballs and sauce (pictured below). Colin has remained in the kitchen with me, enthusiastically helping prepare whatever is on the menu, but particularly partial to chopping salads. We will continue to pick at least one recipe from each chapter to learn.  There are so many good ones, the only hard part is deciding which to make. Caleb’s part thus far has been limited to eating what the rest of us make.

If you’ve watched Colin’s video then you have become part of the Food Revolution.  You’ve seen a ten year old do it.  Why not print the recipe yourself and make it one night this week?  I bet you will love it.  Then pass it on to someone you know.  Give them the recipe and show them how to make it.  Or at least pass on Colin’s demo.  Keep it going. Cooking fresh meals from scratch really can be easy.  Help up spread the word.

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Visit Jamie’s website for more about his Ministry of Food Campaign, read about how you can pass it on, watch Jamie prepare his sizzling beef stir fry recipe, and print your own copy here.

Up next, Colin meets with school personnel to discuss the current state of the menu.

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 1: Flash Mob

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 3: The School Meeting

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 1: Flash Mob

Colin

Yep, Colin. This blog is dedicated to Caleb, but this post is about his brother, Colin, and his love of eating good food. What does this have to do with Caleb and/or diabetes? Well nothing really.

I am of the belief that good eating habits benefit anyone.  That sounds rather obvious, I agree. I state this because there seems to be greater pressure on people with diabetes to eat well.  “Pooh”, I say.  Just because Caleb has type 1 diabetes doesn’t mean he is held to a different standard.  I believe we all have a responsibility to eat well.  Before he was diagnosed, I cooked mostly from scratch and made healthy meals for my family.  Although my awareness of good nutrition is now heightened because I see it in Caleb’s BGs all day every day, for the most part we make the same food choices we would have otherwise.

Back to Colin.

Colin loves food. To hear him say, “I’m full”, is cause for celebration.  He eats and he eats a lot.  You would not know this to look at him.

I promise he eats more than most adults.

He is lean.  We refer to him as “spider monkey”.  Colin can pack it in, but he doesn’t pack it on.  I believe this is in part because of what he chooses to eat.  He has a strong preference for fruits and vegetables.  What some would consider an ample offering of fruit for their entire family would be what Colin chooses to eat as his serving alone – I’m not exaggerating.  When on vacation, Colin gets excited at the prospect of varied choices of salads (no dressing please or there will be a very grumpy Colin, and it’s pretty hard to make Colin grumpy).  The snack he brings to school on a daily basis is a fresh apple or pear whose cores are barely recognizable when he is done.  Beverage of choice – water or milk.  He takes pride in the fact that he’s never had a sip of soda in his life and doesn’t ever intend to.

Pizza, Chinese food, pretzels, cake and even the occasional candy are also part of what Colin enjoys.  But for the most part, his palette favors things that are fresh.

To help you understand that this is not all a result of nurture, Caleb and Lila, who both enjoy the healthy foods given them, get giddily excited at the offering of what qualifies as “junk food”.  Colin’s reaction is one of tolerance.  This is not from pressure that I have put on him.  It’s just Colin.

Enter Jamie Oliver.

We watched Jamie’s Food Revolution show as a family and we loved it.  I am not fond of school lunches.  Not only do I think the options are, um, well, not the most nutritious, but when I allowed Colin to pick one day per week to buy lunch at school, he always came home hungry.  Not it’s-time-for-a-snack hungry, but oh-my-gosh-did-you-skip-lunch hungry.  If I had to pack something to supplement a school lunch, well then forget the school lunch.

Now here’s Jamie – this hip, fun guy telling my kids all the things I have told them.  Thank you sir!  Colin didn’t need any convincing, but I’m glad to have these things reinforced with the younger two.

Colin’s excitement about the Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution spilled over to his 10th birthday and he had a Food Revolution themed party.

If you haven’t seen Jamie’s Show, the premise is to teach people to prepare healthy meals from scratch, quickly and easily.  One of the ways that Jamie did this in the town featured in his show was through stirring excitement via a Flash Mob at Marshall University.  If you didn’t see it, here it is (it’s helpful to watch to fully appreciate the next video):

And this is how Colin, Caleb and Lila surprised our family after most of them arrived to celebrate  (it pales in comparison to Jamie’s performance, but we had fun with it):

This is only the beginning of Colin’s Food Revolution.

Up next, Colin does as Jamies asks in his book – he “passes it on”.  I promise there is real food in Part 2.

In part 3 he sees what he can do about his own school’s menu.

If you haven’t already, please consider signing Jamie’s petition to improve the food offered in schools in the United States.

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Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 2: Pass It On

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 3: The School Meeting