Jamie Oliver Mentions Colin | Food Revolution Update

People on Jamie Oliver’s team heard about Colin and his mini Food Revolution.  What a thrill to hear Jamie kick off his most recent newsletter message with a shout out to Colin!  If you haven’t seen it, Colin’s picture is embedded smack dab in the middle of the newsletter (okay, well, more toward the bottom).

Thank you Jamie Oliver.  You made “this little ten year old” so very proud!

And heartfelt thanks to all who came by to read Colin’s story and leave comments.  Your encouragement and support mean a great deal not only to Colin, but also to me, his mom.

Here’s Jamie’s shout out:

Part of Jamie’s appeal is his sincere passion for making a difference.  If there’s anyone out there who doubts that he’s the real deal, I share one of the messages I received directly from him:

Jamie, you sir are a top man.  Thank you for all that you are doing.  To say that you are an inspiration hardly captures the impact you have had on my family.

The focus of this blog is my other son, Caleb and his life with type 1 diabetes.  I started this Food Revolution series saying it had little to do with diabetes.  But the reality is that making healthy food choices, although important for all people, really makes a difference in managing blood sugars.  Jamie’s message not only helps me as a parent that wants to encourage good eating habits for all my children, but also as the parent of a child with type 1 diabetes who, at times, can feel guilty that perhaps I let diabetes influence my decisions.  With Jamie’s encouragement, I know that the decisions I make for my children are what I would have made, or at least should have made, even if I wasn’t a parent of a KWD.  I bet that’s a bi-product that Jamie hadn’t planned.

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 1: Flash Mob

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 2: Pass It On

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 3: The School Meeting

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 3: The School Meeting

Colin with his Food Revolution Planning Binder

The final installment of this series (for now) is about Colin’s Food Revolution meeting at school. Over the past few months, Colin has been working with someone else who feels as strongly about the food options offered to students: Mrs. P, the school nurse.

There’s reading, writing, and arithmetic, but I think this learning experience is perhaps more important than any of them.  Mrs. P has taken it upon herself to mentor Colin through this process. She and Colin talked about what they could do, what they should do and how to go about it. Together, and with the aide of Jamie Oliver’s planning guide, they came up with goals and a plan to achieve them. Mrs. P coordinated a meeting with the district’s school lunch general manager and one of his colleagues.

I helped Colin set an agenda and accumulate data. He went though the lunch menus for the past three months. He tallied the number of times pizza was offered as well as other highly processed foods like chicken nuggets, chicken patties and mozzarella sticks, and then everything else. The “other” category, although not made from fresh ingredients, at least included items that appeared to be an attempt at more healthy options.

Here’s a summary of that data:

School lunch options offered over three months

If you watched the first show of the Food Revolution television series, you saw kids in school eating pizza for breakfast. I was shocked.  I was even more surprised to see it on the menu of my children’s schools. My kids eat breakfast at home and bring lunch to school, so I hadn’t paid any attention to the school menu. Not until Colin showed me.

The above chart depicts only lunch options, but you can see that pizza is offered for almost one of every two lunches served.  Two-thirds of all lunches are highly processed foods.

At the time of the meeting I was running errands, but was completely distracted knowing Colin, at the ripe old age of ten, was making the first presentation of his life of this importance. Both Colin and Mrs. P told me how it went.  Here are the highlights:

  • Colin thanked everyone for meeting with him, explained who he was and why healthy food options at school were important to him.
  • The food service representatives explained what progress they have made to improve the quality of the food at school.
  • They discussed the current menu and compared it to Jamie Oliver’s two week menu plan. Colin explained the merits of serving meals prepared from fresh ingredients and the impact it has on children and their ability to learn.
  • They talked about forming a student council to meet monthly to address food issues.
  • They debated to some extent what constitutes a healthy meal. Colin was asked about what he eats for breakfast, lunch and dinner. All parties agreed there was room for improvement in the school’s menu.
  • They discussed surveying the student population to see what things people would like to see on the menu and to assess interest in healthier options.
  • Colin was tasked to come up with the number one thing he would like to see removed from the menu, and the first meal he would like to add to replace it.

My perception is that it was a productive start to planting “a seed of change” and the food service people were open to further discussion. But it was also clear that Colin was dealing with a for-profit company. Their conversation gravitated to the bottom line. They talked about expenses and what menu items sell the most. Healthier foods are more costly. Kids buy pizza and lots of it.

Colin remains undeterred. He will continue to meet, plan and execute with Mrs. P. He is determined to see the above chart move to a pie of complete yellow, where yellow represents meals made from fresh foods.  He has me, Mrs. P and Jamie Oliver behind him. He has much work ahead of him.

Colin, there isn’t a day that goes by that you don’t do something that makes me proud. This day was certainly no exception.

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 1: Flash Mob

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 2: Pass It On

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 1: Flash Mob

Colin

Yep, Colin. This blog is dedicated to Caleb, but this post is about his brother, Colin, and his love of eating good food. What does this have to do with Caleb and/or diabetes? Well nothing really.

I am of the belief that good eating habits benefit anyone.  That sounds rather obvious, I agree. I state this because there seems to be greater pressure on people with diabetes to eat well.  “Pooh”, I say.  Just because Caleb has type 1 diabetes doesn’t mean he is held to a different standard.  I believe we all have a responsibility to eat well.  Before he was diagnosed, I cooked mostly from scratch and made healthy meals for my family.  Although my awareness of good nutrition is now heightened because I see it in Caleb’s BGs all day every day, for the most part we make the same food choices we would have otherwise.

Back to Colin.

Colin loves food. To hear him say, “I’m full”, is cause for celebration.  He eats and he eats a lot.  You would not know this to look at him.

I promise he eats more than most adults.

He is lean.  We refer to him as “spider monkey”.  Colin can pack it in, but he doesn’t pack it on.  I believe this is in part because of what he chooses to eat.  He has a strong preference for fruits and vegetables.  What some would consider an ample offering of fruit for their entire family would be what Colin chooses to eat as his serving alone – I’m not exaggerating.  When on vacation, Colin gets excited at the prospect of varied choices of salads (no dressing please or there will be a very grumpy Colin, and it’s pretty hard to make Colin grumpy).  The snack he brings to school on a daily basis is a fresh apple or pear whose cores are barely recognizable when he is done.  Beverage of choice – water or milk.  He takes pride in the fact that he’s never had a sip of soda in his life and doesn’t ever intend to.

Pizza, Chinese food, pretzels, cake and even the occasional candy are also part of what Colin enjoys.  But for the most part, his palette favors things that are fresh.

To help you understand that this is not all a result of nurture, Caleb and Lila, who both enjoy the healthy foods given them, get giddily excited at the offering of what qualifies as “junk food”.  Colin’s reaction is one of tolerance.  This is not from pressure that I have put on him.  It’s just Colin.

Enter Jamie Oliver.

We watched Jamie’s Food Revolution show as a family and we loved it.  I am not fond of school lunches.  Not only do I think the options are, um, well, not the most nutritious, but when I allowed Colin to pick one day per week to buy lunch at school, he always came home hungry.  Not it’s-time-for-a-snack hungry, but oh-my-gosh-did-you-skip-lunch hungry.  If I had to pack something to supplement a school lunch, well then forget the school lunch.

Now here’s Jamie – this hip, fun guy telling my kids all the things I have told them.  Thank you sir!  Colin didn’t need any convincing, but I’m glad to have these things reinforced with the younger two.

Colin’s excitement about the Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution spilled over to his 10th birthday and he had a Food Revolution themed party.

If you haven’t seen Jamie’s Show, the premise is to teach people to prepare healthy meals from scratch, quickly and easily.  One of the ways that Jamie did this in the town featured in his show was through stirring excitement via a Flash Mob at Marshall University.  If you didn’t see it, here it is (it’s helpful to watch to fully appreciate the next video):

And this is how Colin, Caleb and Lila surprised our family after most of them arrived to celebrate  (it pales in comparison to Jamie’s performance, but we had fun with it):

This is only the beginning of Colin’s Food Revolution.

Up next, Colin does as Jamies asks in his book – he “passes it on”.  I promise there is real food in Part 2.

In part 3 he sees what he can do about his own school’s menu.

If you haven’t already, please consider signing Jamie’s petition to improve the food offered in schools in the United States.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 2: Pass It On

Colin’s Food Revolution | Part 3: The School Meeting