Making the low go.

Just part of the stash.

Thanks to everyone who checked in yesterday! Caleb really enjoyed reading all your comments. He sat and smiled and even chuckled out loud a couple of times. He has no idea what the food police are, but he found that reference downright hysterical.

It was great to read all your Day 1 posts and the different ways you all went about describing your day in the life of diabetes.

Caleb’s contribution today is most definitely short, and undeniably sweet!

Day 2 of Diabetes Blog Week.

Making the low go. Tell us your favorite way to treat a low.

Caleb’s top choices in his words:
Mom, it really doesn’t matter to me. I use lots of sugar tablets. My favorite is apple because they are sour. I use them especially at school because it’s easy, but I also like:

juice,

raisins,

yogurt covered raisins,

sour Skittles,

Starbursts,

Yogos,

sugar cubes,

sugar packets,

Swedish fish,

dried apricots

and pretzels.

That’s it – quick and to the point.

Unsealed and ready to go.
Unsealed and ready to go.

I try to unseal all the containers as soon as I get them so I don’t have to waste time with those nasty buggers when Caleb needs sugar FAST!

As a side note, Caleb says they are easy, but he’s told me before that he prefers glucose tabs at school because they appear more like medicine.  It makes him uncomfortable to eat a “treat” or drink juice around the other kids since they don’t also get to indulge (or perhaps its more like avoiding the envious eyes around the classroom).

If you missed it, Day 1 – A day in the life with…diabetes.

Tomorrow’s topic: Your Biggest Supporter.

Caleb’s 1st Complete Pod Change – Part One

No bubbles

Caleb has often helped change his Pod, but he has never done a complete change from beginning to end. There’s a level of dexterity necessarily to fill the syringe that fills the Pod. Considering the size of the needle used to do this, I have always interceded at this step. (I once stabbed the tip of my finger with that needle – it left an entry and exit wound and a half inch bruise from one point to the other. That thing is serious.)

But Caleb is seven now, and is showing more independence and responsibility in many aspects of life. Why not diabetes too?

When asked if he wanted to do the whole change, his face lit up, “really?”

With some expired supplies, our extra PDM, and his good friend Rufus, Caleb practiced. He did beautifully. I’ve always thought the hardest part of a Pod change is getting the bubbles out of the syringe. He listened to my instruction and did it with relative ease. Much better than my first time, that’s for sure.

Since then, the favorite thing to do in the house is to care for Rufus with bolus’, injections, bg checks and lots of love.

Here’s the video I put together of this monumental occasion.  Stay tuned for Part Two.